Career Blog

Preparing for Behavioral Interview Questions

 

 

Behavioral Interview questioning is now a part of most job interviews. Behavioral based interviewing is questioning used to determine how you will react in specific, on-the-job, situations. By asking questions about how you have reacted in the past to certain scenarios, the interviewer will predict how you will perform in the future.

To prepare for this type of questioning, take some time to recall challenging situations you have dealt with or projects you have worked on.  Prepare stories that highlight successful problem-solving and high achievement.  Write out at least one story for each of your past jobs and one story for each of your recent accomplishments. You will use these stories as a framework for responding to behavioral interview questions that you might be asked.

When crafting your stories, focus on explaining the situation and problem you faced in a compelling way.  Telling a compelling story will make you appear more likable.  Indicate the specific steps you took toward resolution and how you solved the problem.  Conclude with quantifiable results. This could be the dollar amount of a promotion or the dollar amount of increased profits. Write out each story and put your brand on it. Your brand is your unique individual image or the set of talents and strengths that you want to communicate to the employer.

Be sure to listen carefully to the question, ask for clarification if needed, offer a detailed and clear response, and always be honest. Keep in mind that there are no right or wrong answers.

      Examples of Behavioral Interview Questions:

  • Of which accomplishment are you most proud? Why?
  • How did you solve a problem or overcome a challenge? What was the outcome?
  • How do you handle schedule interruptions?
  • How have you handled a conflict with an employee or supervisor?
  • When working in a team, what role do you usually take? Why?
  • What strategies do you use to control your temper on the job?
  • How have you used logic to solve a problem?
  • How have you worked to reach your goals?
  • What coping strategies do you use when under a great deal of pressure?
  • When you made a mistake, how did you handle the situation?
  • Describe a decision you made that was unpopular. How did you handle it?
  • Discuss a time when you did not meet your goal. Why did it happen?

Start preparing and practicing your stories now so that you will be ready to handle any tricky behavioral interview that comes your way.  Be prepared so you can promote your successes and strengths to the hiring manager.

 

Kathy Lin - Tal HealthcareWritten by:
Kathy Lin, Marketing Communications Manager
Kathy writes content for Tal Healthcare, a healthcare career website. She has a background in recruiting, sales, and teaching.  She holds a BA in Biology from the University of Vermont.  When she isn’t writing you can find her outside running, skiing or biking.

Phenomenal Physician Assistant Interview Tips

Physician Assistant job interviews can be challenging. You need to impress both the hiring manager and the physician with whom you will be working. Show them you have a passion for the field and the position. These tips will help you stand above the rest as the top Physician Assistant candidate for the job.
Physician Assistant job interviews can be challenging. You need to impress both the hiring manager and the physician with whom you will be working. Show them you have a passion for the field and the position. These tips will help you stand above the rest as the top Physician Assistant candidate for the job.
Prepare Your Documentation
1. Take the initiative to bring all the right paperwork with you to your interview, even if you are not asked to.  Your documentation should include: resume, licenses, registrations, degrees, and certifications. Having the right documents at your fingertips will show you are organized and prepared.
2. Dress Appropriately
 You only have one chance to make a first impression; make sure it’s the right one. Even though the professional world is becoming more casual, a business suit is still the standard for a physician assistant interview. If applicable, keep your makeup, hair and jewelry understated and minimal. Avoid heavy perfume or cologne. Hide any facial piercings and tattoos.
3.  Research the Facility or Practice
Visit the organization’s website. Learn about their history and services. Look up the profiles of key leaders and physicians in the organization and those you will be meeting.  Pay close attention to their backgrounds so that you can ask them pointed questions about their position or training. Show that you have gone above and beyond to make sure this organization and position is the one for you. This will set you apart.
4. Prepare for Performance-Based Behavioral Questions
Employers often want to see you think on your feet during the interview.  To achieve this, they often ask specific performance-based behavioral questions. These are questions regarding how you have acted in past situations such as:
  • How have you solved a clinical challenge? What was the outcome?
  • How have you handled a conflict with a colleague over the management of a patient?
  • What have you done to improve patient safety?
  • What coping strategies have you used when under pressure?
  • Have you ever been on a team that wasn’t functioning optimally? What did you do to resolve it?
To prepare for this type of questioning, take some time to recall challenging situations you have encountered.  Prepare stories that highlight successful problem-solving and achievement. Use these stories as a framework for responding to performance-based behavioral questions. The employer will want to see your compassion and quick-thinking skills.
5. Prepare for all Types of Questions
You can expect all types of questions from hiring managers and physicians.  They may ask about your past, your education, your personality and your aspirations.  Go through this list and formulate an answer for each. Practice with a friend who can give you feedback.
  • Why do you want to work in this healthcare facility/hospital?
  • Why do you want to work with this unit?
  • How do you think healthcare professionals should interact with patients?
  • How do you deal with a difficult family member of a patient?
  • What steps have you taken in the past six months to improve yourself?
  • What qualities do you value most in other physician assistants?
  • What qualities do you value most in the physicians you’ve worked with?
  • Do you see yourself working as a physician assistant in ten years?
  • What initially led you to be interested in becoming a physician assistant?
  • Why do you feel you’d be a good fit as a physician assistant here?
  • If someone had to describe you with three words, what three words would they use?
  • What are you passionate about outside of caring for patients?
  • How do you feel about late shifts or early shifts?
  • What are some things you hope to accomplish in your career?
  • How do you measure success?
  • If you could have your choice of any job, what would you do and why?
  • What motivates you in particular?
  • What other skills have you developed that would be useful in your role as a physician assistant?
  • Why should our healthcare facility/hospital hire you as a physician assistant?
  • Why do you feel you are the best candidate?
  • Is there any change you’d like to see at this hospital/healthcare facility that would make you choose this job over some of the others you are considering?
  • Give an example of when you had to go the extra mile for a patient or a patient’s family.
  • How would you improve the levels of patient care at this hospital/healthcare facility?
  • Patients are not always forthcoming about their medical history; how do you get them to disclose all the important and relevant information to provide quality care?
  • What does quality of care mean to you?
  • If asked to go above and beyond, or work longer shifts to accommodate increased patient numbers, would you be comfortable?
The more you prepare and practice, the more confident you will feel. Let your passion as a Physician Assistant shine. Take the initiative now so you will be at the top of your game during the interview.
Kathy Lin - Tal HealthcareWritten by:
Kathy Lin, Marketing Communications Manager
Kathy writes content for Tal Healthcare, a healthcare career website. She has a background in recruiting, sales, and teaching.  She holds a BA in Biology from the University of Vermont.  When she isn’t writing you can find her outside running, skiing or biking.

60 Power Words for Resume Success

 

Your resume is the most critical tool for landing an interview. This brief snapshot of your career needs to be precisely crafted. Use powerful action verbs that will enable you to quantify your contributions. Strong word choices will bring a confident tone to your resume.

Your resume is the most critical tool for landing an interview. This brief snapshot of your career needs to be precisely crafted. Avoid weak, tired or passive words.  Instead, use powerful action verbs that will enable you to quantify your contributions.  Strong word choices will bring a confident tone to your resume.  Keep these rules in mind as you craft or overhaul your resume:

  • Bullets: Use bullet points so your achievements stand out. The most important bullets must appear at the top.
  • Quantify: Combine powerful verbs with quantifiable For each accomplishment include how many, how much, how long or how often. For example, “Negotiated and closed 100 individual contracts over $30,000 each.”
  • Keywords: Keywords are the skills and qualifications that the hiring manager is looking for. You will find these in the job description for the job you are applying for. Many resumes are screened by an applicant tracking system that will search for relevant keywords.  The hiring manager will only view your resume if these words get picked up.
  • Proof: Just one typo can cause your resume to end up in the rejection pile. Review it multiple times, do a line-by-by line edit, read it backward, and have a friend do the same.
  • Verbs: Powerful verbs make your resume stand out. Start each bullet point with one of these verbs to show how you have achieved success.
1. Accelerated
2. Accomplished
3. Achieved
4. Advanced
5. Advocated
6. Analyzed
7. Audited
8. Boosted
9. Built
10. Chaired
11. Compiled
12. Converted
13. Created
14. Cultivated
15. Decreased
16. Designed
17. Determined
18. Developed
19. Directed
20. Discovered

21. Eliminated
22. Enhanced
23. Examined
24. Exceeded
25. Expanded
26. Forged
27. Formulated
28. Generated
29. Improved
30. Increased
31. Inspired
32. Integrated
33. Invented
34. Maximized
35. Measured
36. Mentored
37. Merged
38. Minimized
39. Mobilized
40. Moderated

41. Motivated
42. Negotiated
43. Optimized
44. Orchestrated
45. Overhauled
46. Persuaded
47. Piloted
48. Pioneered
49. Planned
50. Produced
51. Promoted
52. Proved
53. Pursued
54. Quantified
55. Reduced
56. Resolved
57. Spear­headed
58. Stimulated
59. Streamlined
60. Strengthened


Use the right power words to pump up your resume and increase your chances of getting an interview.

 

Kathy Lin - Tal HealthcareWritten by:
Kathy Lin, Marketing Communications Manager
Kathy writes content for Tal Healthcare, a healthcare career website. She has a background in recruiting, sales, and teaching.  She holds a BA in Biology from the University of Vermont.  When she isn’t writing you can find her outside running, skiing or biking.

Tal Healthcare Celebrates National Health Center Week 2018

A National Campaign to Celebrate Health Care Heroes

 

Tal Healthcare is proud to partner with many health centers in the Northeast.  Across the United States, health centers serve more than 27 million Americans.  Health centers have compiled a significant record of success that includes:

  • Producing $24 billion in annual health system savings
  • Reducing unnecessary hospitalizations and unnecessary visits to the emergency room
  • Treating patients for a fraction of the average cost of one emergency room visit
  • Maintaining patient satisfaction levels of nearly 100 percent
  • Serving more than one in six Medicaid beneficiaries for less than two percent of the national Medicaid budget
  • Lowering the cost of children’s primary care by approximately 35 percent

The heroes who work at health centers and help make affordable healthcare possible for people in need are at the center of the year’s National Health Center Week, August 12-18. More than 205,000 people work at health centers in positions that include clinicians, nurses, pharmacists, social workers, dentists, dental hygienists, behavioral health specialists, and much more.  Working together, these healthcare heroes produce innovative solutions to the most pressing healthcare issues in their communities. They reach beyond the walls of conventional medicine to address the factors that may cause sickness, such as lack of nutrition, mental illness, homelessness and substance use disorders. It is their work that has helped reduce healthcare costs and chronic disease.

 

To learn more about National Health Center Week and a listing of events please visit: www.healthcenterweek.org. You can also follow the conversation using #NHCW18 on Twitter.

In the News: Tal Healthcare Attends HLNY Past Presidents Boat Cruise

 

Tal Healthcare was at the HLNY Past Presidents Boat Cruise to help honor Healthcare Leaders of New York (HLNY) past presidents and celebrate their commitment to the healthcare industry. HLNY is the local chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). Together these organizations advance healthcare leadership and management excellence through professional enrichment and continuing education. These institutions have nurtured the careers of many Healthcare Leaders.

Pictured from left to right: Brooke Markowitz, Magdalena Kociuba, Dee Ashraf, Ami Diombera. Not pictured, Lea Tal and Avi Shah

 

July 31, 2018Tal Healthcare was at the HLNY Past Presidents Boat Cruise to help honor Healthcare Leaders of New York (HLNY) past presidents and celebrate their commitment to the healthcare industry. HLNY is the local chapter of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE).  Together these organizations advance healthcare leadership and management excellence through professional enrichment and continuing education. These institutions have nurtured the careers of many Healthcare Leaders. Lea Tal, CEO at Tal Healthcare, proudly states, “We have been a long-time member of ACHE and we are a Gold Sponsor of HLNY. It is our philosophy as well, to assist and mentor those whose Healthcare goals include Leadership roles and connecting with those whose careers are devoted to improving the Healthcare industry.” Avi Shah, Recruitment Account Manager at Tal Healthcare, noted, “It was a perfect night to network with members and past presidents.  We all enjoyed boating in the New York Harbor, taking in the sites, and the beautiful summer evening.”

8 Steps for Building Resilience and Finding Career Success

 

Resilience in the Workplace

 

Resilience is the inner strength to weather unexpected obstacles and setbacks. It is critical for
long-term success. Resilience is a learned behavior that you can start building and
strengthening today. It will bring power, confidence, and direction to your career. It will
enable you to be more comfortable in an ever-changing work environment. When you gain
resilience, you will create a more successful career and find more joy in life.
Start Building Up Your Resilience Today:
1. Focus on Optimism

Optimists are more resilient than pessimists. If you have pessimistic tendencies, you can
become more optimistic. Start by surrounding yourself with positive people and creating an
optimistic environment. Make positive thinking the norm. View the things and people in
your life as supporting you rather than holding you back.

2. Increase Your Flexibility

When problems arise, see them as challenges or opportunities to learn and grow. If you
meet challenges as a chance for creative problem solving, you will find ways to grow. Having
a flexible mind will help you adapt and be resilient. Flexibility will help you to recover from
setbacks.

3. Participate in Learning

Become a lifelong learner. The best way to deal with change is to change yourself – learn.
Learning something new will keep your skills relevant. Be adaptable by embracing every
chance to learn something new.

4. Chart Your Career Path

Take ownership of your career and plan your career path. You can treat your career like a
business enterprise. Consider your bosses to be your customers and understand what they
pay you for. Look for ways to add value. Make a mission statement. Set your goals for the
year and for five years from now.

5. Cultivate a Sense of Purpose

A sense of purpose is the motivation that drives you toward a fulfilling future. The purpose is
what drives us. Purpose does not have to be grandiose. It can be enhancing your
interactions with your colleagues. Or creating a sense of forward momentum by relating
today’s work to your career goals. Having a sense of purpose will help you to stay resilient
on the difficult days.

6. Widen Your Network

Continually grow and develop a strong network of contacts within your workplace and
outside. Go to networking events and join groups. Find mentors and mentees. Look for
ways to support your friends, colleagues and the people you meet. When you are there to
support others, they will be there to help you through difficult times.

7. Accept Your Imperfections

Don’t hide from your weaknesses. Instead, acknowledge them and view them as
opportunities to learn and grow. You can find strategies to work around the imperfection.
Aiming for perfection is a dangerous road. Worries about making mistakes often lead to
paralysis and inaction. Accepting your weaknesses will free you up to try new things and to
be more resilient.

8. Train for the Future

Stay in shape both physically and emotionally. Being in good physical shape has a dramatic
positive impact on your mental health. Being physically tough will make you mentally
tougher and more resilient.

Resilience is a valuable skill that you can learn and build. Like any valuable skill, it is worth
the effort. Being more resilient will have a positive impact on all aspects of your life and
career.
Kathy Lin - Tal Healthcare
Written by:
Kathy Lin, Marketing Communications Manager
Kathy writes content for Tal Healthcare, a healthcare career website. She has a background in recruiting, sales, and teaching.  She holds a BA in Biology from the University of Vermont.  When she isn’t writing you can find her outside running, skiing or biking.