Career Blog

Tal Healthcare Is with You Every Step of the Way

 

Tal Healthcare is your home for career growth. When you embark on the journey toward growing your career, Tal Healthcare is there for you every step of the way. We match candidates with opportunities at all levels of Healthcare: C Suite, VP’s, Physicians, Medical Directors, Nurses, Physician Assistants, Finance, Practice Administrators and more.

Tal Healthcare is your home for career growth.  When you embark on the journey toward growing your career, Tal Healthcare is there for you every step of the way. We match job seekers with a variety of opportunities at all levels of Healthcare: C Suite, VP’s, Physicians, Medical Directors, Nurses, Physician Assistants, Finance, Practice Administrators. Tal Healthcare offers resume consultation, interview preparation, clear arrival information, moral support, interviewing tips, reference checks, negotiation expertise and so much more. Click below to watch the video and see how. Visit our website to connect with one of our expert recruiters now.

 

Thank You Nurses for All You Do

 

National Nurses Week is a time to thank nurses for delivering the highest level of quality care to patients while providing compassion and kindness. Nurses are the heroes of healthcare. They heal the world one patient at a time. Your career in nursing is an inspiration.
May 6, 2018 – National Nurses Week begins today.  This annual celebration is a time to celebrate all that nurses do. Thank you to all nurses for delivering the highest level of quality care to patients while providing compassion and kindness. Nurses are the heroes of healthcare.  They have many superpowers: healer, clinician, leader, teacher, collaborator, innovator, coach, ally, mentor, detective, and advocate. Nurses heal the world one patient at a time. Your career in nursing is an inspiration to all of us. To mark this special week, we put together a short video celebrating all nurses and to say, “Thank You Nurses for all you do.”

 

The Perfect Post-Interview Thank You Email

 

Sending a thank you note via email after an interview is not just good manners, it is mandatory. Whether it was a phone interview, a video interview or an in-person interview, send a thank you note via email to each person you spoke with.

 

Sending a thank you note via email after an interview is not just good manners, it is mandatory.  Whether it was a phone interview, a video interview or an in-person interview, send a thank you note via email to each person you spoke with. 
Email Content:
                         1. Remind

You are not the only candidate for the job. Writing a thank you note is the perfect way to remind the interviewer why you are the best candidate.

                         2. Sell

The thank you note is an excellent opportunity to reiterate your skills and accomplishments and indicate the value you will add to the organization.

                        3. Fill in the Blanks

Did you leave the interview wishing that you had brought up additional points? The thank you note is an excellent chance to bring up these points.

                        4. Show Value

This is also a chance to show your value even before you start.  If during the interview, the topic of a current problem facing the organization came up, you can take this opportunity to propose solutions that you have researched or that you have utilized in the past.

                        5. Indicate Enthusiasm

Indicate your enthusiasm about the job, the organization, and the people you met. Reiterate your desire to join their team.

What to Do:
                       1. Send One Message to Each Interviewer

Each person you met with gets an email.  Do not address one message to multiple people. If you do not have the email address for each person, your recruiter will be able to obtain it for you.

                       2. Create a Strong Subject Line

The subject line should include the words “Thank you”, the job title and your name.

                      3. Edit and Proof Read

The thank you note must be error free and well written so be sure to proofread and edit before sending.

                     4. Send Within 24 Hours of the Interview

Send the thank you note within 24 hours of your interview, but wait at least one hour after the end of the interview.

Example:

Your email should not be formulaic.  The best note is one that is personalized.  Below is a very basic example just to get you started.

Subject: Thank you – [Job Name] – [Your Name]
Dear [Interviewer Name],
Thank you for meeting with me today. It was a pleasure to learn more about your team and the position of [job title]. I’m very excited about the prospect of joining [organization name] and helping [main job responsibility] with your team.
As we discussed, my experience in [list your skills and/or achievements] make me a perfect fit. I also have the [skills omitted from interview] skills which would be an asset for [additional responsibilities of the job].
In researching [problem discussed in the interview], I found that [strategies] have been useful.  I would enjoy speaking with you in more detail about this.
I look forward to hearing from you about the next steps in the hiring process. Please do not hesitate to contact me if I can provide additional information.
Best regards,
[Your Name]
[Your Contact Info]

 

Send the perfect post-interview email and be the standout candidate who moves forward in the interview process.

Globalization and Physician Movement

How globalization’s placement or displacement of physicians is impacting healthcare.

How globalization’s placement or displacement of physicians is impacting healthcare

Healthcare remains local in an increasingly global economy. As such, it has become the largest employer in the United States. Reasons for this growth range from an aging population to its structure as both a private and publicly subsidized industry. Globalization may never move healthcare jobs across oceans, but it is disrupting US healthcare in less apparent but equally dramatic ways. As both physicians and diseases move more easily through borders, global health is more at risk and better able to able to address that risk at the same time.

While healthcare has been growing, manufacturing has fallen off in the United States, with globalization taking much of the blame after automation is taken into consideration. A stable workforce does not represent healthcare’s immunity to globalization, however. Though globalization has not impacted the size of the healthcare sector, the complex phenomenon is changing it dramatically and irrevocably.

A strong correlation can be shown between the wealth of a nation and the overall health of its population. While some societies which have embraced globalization have flourished, its relationship with the strength of an economy is complex and often confounding. Furthermore, there is no one metric to indicate a nation’s acceptance of globalization. For this reason, it is difficult to argue that globalization itself only improves healthcare worldwide.

Globalization has driven physicians from the poorest countries into the richest. In the United States, graduates of foreign medical programs are in demand as the shortage of physicians continues. Particularly affected are specialties where this shortage is most dire, such as psychiatry and family medicine. In wealthy nations, this influx of highly skilled labor is positive. The same cannot be said for the developing nations losing valuable expertise.

In epidemiology, globalization presents as categorically bad for the health of the world.  In addition to shifting talent from poorer to richer nations, globalization has altered the world of medicine by facilitating international travel. The power such travel gives to potential epidemics represents a dire threat to every country. Diseases that would have burned out quickly can now spread rapidly and unpredictably.

Ironically, international travel creates a potential remedy to the problems it causes for healthcare. Such travel allows physicians to meet needs in far-flung places where modern healthcare was once inaccessible. Historical failures to halt the spread of diseases has made epidemiologists vigilant, and access to rapid international travel and resources has empowered them to act on this vigilance. During recent outbreaks, this ease of movement for physicians has helped stop the growth of potential epidemics.

As the world draws closer together, this proximity has mixed results. Diseases travel more easily, but so do physicians. Whether going from a wealthy country to one in need or looking for a better life as a medical professional emigrating to a developed nation, the international movement of healthcare talent because of globalization is a powerful force that isn’t going anywhere.

Don’t be an April Fool: Avoid These 12 Interview Mistakes

Follow this list for the best possible results from your job interview. Use your professionalism and knowledge of business etiquette to turn yourself into the standout candidate. Get on the track to success.

Interviewing is a nerve-racking experience.  So much is at stake and so much can go wrong.  Here is a list of twelve mistakes that will prevent you from moving forward in the interview process.  If you want the best possible results from your job interview, this is your list of what you need to avoid.

 1. Not Researching the Company

Visit the company’s website. Learn about their history and services. Look up the profiles of key leaders in the company and those you will be meeting.  Pay close attention to their backgrounds so that you can ask them pointed questions about their position or training. Show that you have gone above and beyond to make sure this company and position is the one for you. This will set you apart. When asked why you want to join the company, your answer should be “the organization has an excellent reputation. I want to be a part of an exceptional team.” Your research will enable you to give specific examples of excellence within the company.

2. Negativity

Having a bad attitude can be a huge red flag in the first interview. Avoid saying anything negative about your current company, manager or peers. Treat everyone you encounter at the company, from the receptionist to the CEO, with friendliness and respect. It will not go unnoticed.  Always be gracious and appreciative of the interviewer’s time. Walk into the interview with a mix of confidence and humility. Smile and be appropriately enthusiastic about the company and the opportunity.

3. Oversharing

During the interview, you need to impress the company with your talent and skills but refrain from oversharing. Limit your responses to questions relevant to the job. To help achieve this, prepare a short statement on how your background matches the job. When you speak, pause occasionally to collect your thoughts and make sure you are still on topic.

4. Texting

Arrive early but do not look at your phone while you wait. Texting makes you look as if you would rather be elsewhere. Put your phone away. Instead, wait patiently or read. If you can find one, reading a company brochure will reflect an interest in the company. You could also review your notes.

 5. Embellishing

Lying or exaggerating during an interview will destroy your chances of getting hired. Employers do extensive background checks and reference checks. It’s not worth the risk. If found lying, you will not get this job and your reputation could get damaged; word gets around.

6. Rudeness

Rude body-language mistakes include failure to make eye contact, failure to smile and bad posture. Nervous habits like jingling your keys, shaking your leg and scratching your head can be construed as boredom. Instead, use your body language to convey how delighted you are to be considered for this amazing opportunity. No matter how excited you are to be interviewing, swearing is rude. Swearing demonstrates that you can’t deal calmly and thoughtfully with a situation. It does not belong in the interview setting. Interrupting is also rude.  During the interview, your excitement may compel you to cut the interviewer off mid-question. Instead, take a moment to listen and develop a well-thought-out answer with concrete examples. Keep in mind that acting too eager or arrogant will give the interviewer the impression that you are hard to manage.

7. Overeager

Asking, “How did I do?” or “Did I get the job,” projects over-eagerness that borders on desperation. Instead, as the interview concludes, restate your interest in the opportunity and clearly summarize why you are right for this opportunity and for this team. Ask for the job without expecting an answer on the spot.

8. Smoking and Drinking

Never smoke or drink anything before a job interview. Avoid anything that can be smelled on your breath like alcohol, garlic, onions, coffee, and cigarettes.  You want to stand out for your accomplishments, not for the way you smell.

9. Tardiness

Do whatever it takes to avoid being late to the interview. The night before, map out the directions to the interview. Make a plan that will have you arriving at your destination at least 15 minutes early. If you find yourself running way ahead of schedule, go to a coffee shop or walk around the neighborhood.

10. Poor Grooming and Hygiene

First impressions are everything. Dress in business attire even if the dress code is casual. Avoid distracters such as large amounts of makeup, jewelry, perfume or aftershave so that the interviewer can focus on what you are saying. And of course, practice proper hygiene. Before arriving in the reception area, find a restroom where you can complete your final grooming. Be sure to wash your hands. Your portfolio and copies of your resume are all you need to bring to your interview. You will need your hands-free so you can shake hands. Do not arrive with a latte or water bottle.

11. Shyness

Even if you are nervous during the interview, you need to find your voice and talk about yourself.  Go beyond one-word answers. Shyness can be incorrectly interpreted as insecurity or incompetence. Take the time you need to listen to and answer questions thoughtfully. To help ease your anxiety, come to the interview with prepared questions.

12. Skipping a Meal

All moms and top athletes will tell you that nutrition is key for excelling.  Prepare for this interview event as if you are training for an athletic event.  Interview success requires you to be well fueled.  Do not skip meals on interview day.  Also, having a small snack before the interview will prevent you from getting irritable or tired.

Don’t let these mistakes turn you into an April Fool.  Instead, use your professionalism and knowledge of business etiquette to turn yourself into the standout candidate. Get on the track to success.

Are You Lucky? Six Steps to Creating Luck

 

Can you learn to be lucky? Can luck play a role in your career success? The answer to both of these questions is “Yes, absolutely.” Follow these steps to bring more luck and fortune to your life and career.

Can you learn to be lucky? Can luck play a role in your career success? The answer to both of these questions is “Yes, absolutely.” Follow these steps to bring more luck and fortune to your life and career.
1. Expand your Network

Luck is directly proportional to the number of people you know.  People bring opportunities; the more people you know, the more opportunities that will come your way. To grow your network, attend events, conferences, fundraisers, and parties. Put yourself out there, meet people, talk with them and make connections. Also, be sure to cultivate your current friends and maintain strong bonds.

2. Visualize Success

Top athletes visualize winning before a competition. If you are preparing for a job interview or an important professional presentation, visualization will help.  Imagine everything including feeling calm, highlighting your resume, your responses to interview questions and asking the interviewer brilliant questions.  You can visualize success for any goal you want to achieve. Imagining each detail along the path will help you obtain your objectives.

3. Be Positive

A positive attitude is a choice.  You can train yourself to see the best in every situation.  Even when something bad happens, a bright side or a new opportunity can be found. Focus on the positive and look for the silver linings. Negative and debilitating thoughts can affect all of us. Lucky people often use rituals to overcome these thoughts.  They use mantras such as, “You’ve got this.” Or, they have uplifting morning routines like an exercise routine, meditation or walking the dog. Positivity attracts luck.

 4. Give

If you have ever volunteered or mentored, you will know that it makes you feel fantastic.  Not only does volunteering help others, it helps you.  Giving back to the community and those in needs is the right thing to do.  But there are also many unexpected benefits.  You will build connections with those you work with and those you are helping.  You will gain experience, build skills and develop awareness.  Volunteering has been shown to improve health, happiness, and self-esteem.  Lucky people give generously to others.

 5. Set Achievable Goals

Goals that are specific, measurable and achievable will give you direction. Goals that are too lofty or indeterminable are difficult to attain and often fail. Having clear goals allows you to focus on getting exactly what it is that you want out of life and your career.

6. Keep Growing

To rise to your full potential, you should continually challenge yourself to learn and experience new things. Exploring and gaining new insights will enable you to see things from a different perspective. There are many ways to keep growing.  You could earn a new career certification, enroll in an online course, join an association, speak at a conference or ask a mentor for guidance. Push yourself outside of your comfort zone to allow luck to find you.

Lucky people do not rely on luck. They become lucky through self-development, goal setting, positivity, and networking.  Lucky people make a choice. They put in the work required to get the most out of life. Do you want to be one of the lucky people? Get busy.